January 28, 2020

Cartier's Hope | Book Review

*I received an eARC of the book Cartier's Hope by MJ Rose through Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. Receiving a copy of this book for free does not alter my opinions of this book in any way.




Overall thoughts.

There are many things I don’t like about the book. First being the happy ending the main character got even though she is one of the most awful people I’ve had the displeasure of reading about. She claims to have an open mind but the entire book is spent getting revenge at any cost. She hurts people in her path, including her lover, and her only two friends who don’t even know who she really is. 

In the end, she gets everything she wanted; the lover, her friendships, her relationship with her mother. It just bothers me that someone like her still gets what she thinks she deserves. 

The other things I don’t care for are the sex scenes, the way this book wasn’t at all about the Hope Diamond, and the way the main character used blackmail to get what she wanted. Even though blackmail was the reason for the entire book in the first place. 

Another thing that bothered me greatly was the way she talked about and treated men who didn’t like her. There were men in this book who did indeed harm women, but there were also men who were kind to women and respected them. Maybe it wasn’t just because she was a woman that they didn’t like her, it could have been that her personality was terrible and she was just being a bitch.


Catagories I rated.

Character:

Vera Garland spends the entire book blaming others for her circumstances and then getting her "revenge" on those who have done her/her family wrong. She is probably the least likable main character I've ever read about.

World:

I was hoping to see life in the gilded age but there was not much background other than the author using fancy descriptions for things that I didn’t understand. While reading I forgot most of the time that it is a period novel. The only hints were mentions of tenement housing and child labor and the suffragette movement. Other than that it felt like reading a contemporary, which I abhor. 

The dialogue did not sound different from the way we speak now. Usually, when I read a historical novel I’m pulled in by how different the world in the book is to the world I live in. This one covered all of the topics that are talked about today. It was like reading a contemporary staged in 1910 but then the author forgot that the book was set in 1910. You could have slapped a smartphone in the main character's hand and nothing about the story would have needed to change.

Plot:

The plot of this book was seriously lacking. I thought that the book would have more to do with the Hope Diamond and how it tied into the tragedy that the Garland family endures before the book even starts. Unfortunately, this book has almost nothing to do with the Hope Diamond and has a lot to do with the main character twisting the truth and blackmailing people to get what she thinks she deserves.

Writing Style:

There are too many terms I don’t understand. Mostly architectural terms that would have been common in the 1900s but mean absolutely nothing to me in 2020. These terms are probably the only thing about the actual words used that would have been commonplace in 1910. I also had the unpleasant experience of reading the word "spinster" about 5 times more than necessary. The main character is 32 years old. That is not a spinster. A spinster is like 50. Past childbearing age. 32 is not a spinster.

Enjoyment:

I absolutely did not enjoy this book. There was not one thing in this book that I enjoyed and I don't recommend this book for anyone to read.

Rating: 

I gave Cartier's Hope 1.4/5 stars based on my personal rating system. 

In conclusion.

I had such high hopes for this book when I requested it from Net Galley. Unfortunately, this book didn't work out for me. But, we can't like everything we read, can we? It was actually good to be forced to read a book I don't care about. If it wasn't a Net Galley book I would have dnf'd it verrry early on. It was a good experience to read a book, hate it, and then write a book review about it. It was good practice.

Happy reviewing,

Alicen